Elastics (Rubber Bands)

Rubber bands on braces – the elastics that surround each bracket – are just one of many different parts and pieces your orthodontist will adjust during your check-ups. The small rubber or metal elastics, more commonly called

If the rubber bands snap or break, then replace them with a new one. I also got a powerchain on the top and bottom of my teeth. This helps move your upper teeth back and bottom teeth forward and also helps bring the back teeth together and touching. It also attaches to a bottom bicuspid hook along with the bottom 1st molar or 2nd molar hook forming a triangle. I don't want to ask him and my mom for painkillers, because I think that will annoy him.

During the course of orthodontic treatment, a patient with braces may have to wear elastic rubber bands to help with the correction of their malocclusion. Rubber bands come in different lengths and colors, and they place forces on the teeth and jaws.
Besides the larger rubber bands just described to help move the bite, smaller elastics are also used for braces. These tiny rubber bands are used to hold the wire into the brackets (as shown below) and are what most people talk about when they choose colors for their braces.
Jul 12,  · Re: Elastics are killing me!!!!! #12 Post by justwrong» Thu Jul 12, pm I remember the first time i had braces elastics were probably the most painful thing about it. now i have braces again with extractions and i’m not looking forward to the pain of the heavy duty ones:l.
Wearing rubber bands, especially at first, can be confusing! This is an important phase of your therapy. Failure to wear your elastics full time or as instructed will lengthen your treatment time and will make it more difficult to achieve an optimal result.
Jul 12,  · Re: Elastics are killing me!!!!! #12 Post by justwrong» Thu Jul 12, pm I remember the first time i had braces elastics were probably the most painful thing about it. now i have braces again with extractions and i’m not looking forward to the pain of the heavy duty ones:l.

Wearing rubber bands, especially at first, can be confusing! This is an important phase of your therapy. Failure to wear your elastics full time or as instructed will lengthen your treatment time and will make it more difficult to achieve an optimal result.

In fact, when you are eating you're really putting your rubber bands to work and your teeth will move even faster! But, if they really get in your way during a big meal you may need to remove them, even though we urge you to keep them in if you can, especially during casual snacking. You should also wear them when you sleep. Every morning, discard the previous day's elastics and replace them with fresh elastics from the packet we have provided for you.

If you play sports keep your elastics in unless you need to wear a mouth-guard. After removing your mouth-guard, put the elastics back in. You should change your elastics times a day, at the very least every 12 hours, even if they are not broken, because after a while they lose their strength and elasticity.

To help you with this, before you leave we will give you a handout that has a diagram indicating what teeth you need to hook the rubber bands to. If you ever have any questions on how to wear your elastics or may have lost the handout with the diagram that we gave you, please do not hesitate to call, email, or just stop by the office and ask us.

Wearing rubber bands, especially at first, can be confusing! This is an important phase of your therapy. The strength is expressed in ounces and stronger forces are needed when stronger wires are being used i. The name of the elastic helps the patient identify which elastic they are using. Each orthodontic company has their own names for rubber bands i. You should not buy elastics on your own from the internet.

Not all elastics are equivalent and may change your treatment if used improperly! You should only get your elastics from your orthodontist, and use them as directed. Depending on how your orthodontist wants your teeth to move, they will tell you to attach your elastics to certain teeth to help accomplish that movement.

Class II elastic — These elastic usually attach from the upper canine hook to either the bottom 1st molar hook or 2nd molar hook. These elastics help move your upper teeth back and your bottom teeth forward. It also attaches to a bottom bicuspid hook along with the bottom 1st molar or 2nd molar hook forming a triangle. This helps move your upper teeth back and bottom teeth forward and also helps bring the back teeth together and touching.

Class III elastic — This elastic starts from the bottom canine and goes to the upper 1st molar or 2nd molar. This moves your upper teeth forwards and bottom teeth back. This is the opposite movement from a Class II elastic. It also attaches to a upper bicuspid hook along with the upper 1st molar or 2nd molar hook forming a triangle.

This helps move your upper teeth forward and bottom teeth back and also helps bring the back teeth together and touching. Class I elastic — These elastics run from the upper 1st or 2nd molar hook to the upper canine hook. These push teeth together to help close any gaps between the teeth. It can be also used on the bottom teeth.

Box elastic — the elastic is attached to four teeth: Can be attached to any configuration of teeth but are most commonly used on the back teeth. This helps to bring the teeth together and touching. V elastics — these elastics attach to three teeth and form the shape of a V. These elastics help bring teeth together and touching. They can be used on front teeth or back teeth.

Anterior triangle elastic —These elastics usually run from the upper canine hook to the bottom canine and bottom 1st premolar hooks forming the shape of a triangle. Crossbite elastic — These elastics usually run from the inside of an upper tooth to the outside of a bottom tooth to help correct a crossbite a situation where your upper teeth are inside your bottom teeth.

Midline elastic — This elastic can run from the upper canine hook to the bottom canine hook, but it can also be attached to other front teeth.

This helps line up the center of the upper and bottom front teeth.

FREE Elastic Placer for braces is safety sealed with bands, does not Venom Elbow Brace Compression Sleeve - Elastic Support for Tendonitis Pain, Tennis Elbow, Golfer's Elbow, Arthritis, Bursitis, Basketball, Baseball, Football, Golf, Lifting, Sports, Men, Women. by Venom Sports Fitness. Rubber bands on braces – the elastics that surround each bracket – are just one of many different parts and pieces your orthodontist will adjust during your check-ups. The small rubber or metal elastics, more commonly called "rubber bands," that surround your braces are technically called elastic ligatures. Wearing rubber bands, especially at first, can be confusing! This is an important phase of your therapy. Failure to wear your elastics full time or as instructed will lengthen your treatment time and will make it more difficult to achieve an optimal result.